Aging with HIV/AIDS

It has been approximately 30 years since the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that is the cause for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).  Initially individuals being diagnosed as being HIV positive or having AIDS had little options available to them and life expectancy was very short; however, with research, public health education, and medical interventions individuals with HIV/AIDS are living longer, healthier lives.  The face of HIV/AIDS is aging as people with the virus live into their 60s, 70s, and beyond.

The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) has a history of funding HIV/AIDS-related research including research related to aging.  This population experiences unique issues as HIV/AIDS-related medical conditions complicate issues associated with getting older such as vision loss, joint and muscular degeneration, and other age-related disabilities. A search of our REHABDATA database located 32 documents related to HIV/AIDS and aging.  A listing of the citations is available at http://tinyurl.com/7af5msp.

Research on disability and rehabilitation issues facing aging and elderly individuals with HIV/AIDS will continue to be relevant until a cure can be found.

About cgraves34

Media Specialist for the National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC) funded by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) through Administration for Community Living (ACL) under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Aging with HIV/AIDS

  1. Pingback: Making a Media Noise on World AIDS Day – Graying of AIDS

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s